Spacewalkers to Set Up European Robotic Arm Live on NASA TV

Expedition 67 Commander Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of ESA, clad in Russian Orlan spacesuits, will spend about six-and-a-half hours outfitting the European robotic arm on the International Space Station’s Nauka laboratory. Artemyev will wear a Russian spacesuit with red stripes (EV1), while Cristoforetti will wear a Russian suit with blue stripes (EV2).
Expedition 67 Commander Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of ESA, clad in Russian Orlan spacesuits, will spend about six-and-a-half hours outfitting the European robotic arm on the International Space Station’s Nauka laboratory. Artemyev will wear a Russian spacesuit with red stripes (EV1), while Cristoforetti will wear a Russian suit with blue stripes (EV2).

NASA Television coverage is underway of today’s spacewalk with a Russian cosmonaut and an ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut to continue outfitting the European robotic arm on the International Space Station’s Nauka laboratory. Coverage of the spacewalk is on NASA Television, the NASA app, and agency’s website.

Expedition 67 Commander Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of ESA will install platforms and workstation adapter hardware near the European robotic arm, a 37-foot-long manipulator system mounted to the Nauka multipurpose laboratory module. The spacewalkers also will relocate the arm’s external control panel, replace a protective window on the arm’s camera unit, and extend a Strela telescoping boom from Zarya to Poisk to facilitate future spacewalks.

Artemyev and Cristoforetti will exit out of the Poisk module about 10 a.m. EDT to begin the six-and-a-half-hour excursion. Artemyev will wear a Russian spacesuit with red stripes, while Cristoforetti will wear a Russian suit with blue stripes. This will be the sixth spacewalk in Artemyev’s career, and the first for Cristoforetti. It will be the sixth spacewalk at the station in 2022 and the 251st spacewalk for space station assembly, maintenance, and upgrades.

The European robotic arm will be used to move payloads and equipment outside the Russian segment of the station, joining the Canadian-built Canadarm2 robotic arm and the Japanese arm already supporting station maintenance, operations, and research.


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